Archive for the ‘Student reviews’ Category

Here at the library we often notice that students are reading books.  We like this because we love reading books too: in fact it is pretty much our favourite thing to do, along with having cups of tea and alphabetizing stuff.  But what are these young people reading?  And why?  Today we once again confronted some students in the library and demanded to know exactly what was going on with them and their books.

Oscar  (Yr 7)

I’m reading the fourth book in the Scott Pilgrim series, which is called Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together.  It’s a graphic novel about a guy who gets a girlfriend and she has seven evil ex-boyfriends that he has to kill if he wants to be with her.  I’m reading it because one day I was at the library looking at books over there where all the comics are, and I picked up the first book in this series.  After I finished it I looked for the second one but I couldn’t find it so I read the last one and now I’m reading this one.  It’s really funny but it’s kind of about relationships as well.  And also kung fu.  It’s a good book for anybody.

Frida  (Yr 9)

I’m reading Holes by Louis Sachar.  It’s about a boy who gets in trouble and is given the choice between going to a juvenile correction camp and going to jail.  He chooses to go to the camp: he’s never been to camp before because his family’s poor.  All they do at the camp is dig holes, one hole per day every day.  It’s about why they’re digging holes and if he’s going to escape or not.  I heard from people in primary school that it was really good.  It’s not really a girly book but that doesn’t mean that girls won’t like it.  It’s good for everybody.

Morgan  (Yr 10)

I’m starting to read  The Overcoat And Other Short Stories by Nikolai Gogol.  It’s a book of short stories.  I don’t really know what it’s about yet.  I’m reading it because I heard about it from my dad: he said it was amusing.  I’m not sure yet who I would recommend it to.

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Sarah  (Yr 12)

I’m reading Dead Aid by Dambisa Moyo.  It’s about financial difficulties in Africa and why other countries shouldn’t give aid.  People think aid is good but it generally just goes to corrupt leaders who don’t give it to the people.  It also means that people become reliant on aid and can’t establish viable financial means.  The author proposes ceasing all foreign aid to Africa in the next five years.  I’m reading it because Ms Seeger gave it to me: it’s relevant to what we’re doing in International Studies.  I’d recommend this book to anyone who’s interested in the world and politics and making our world better.

Ellen  (Yr 12)

I’m reading The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.  It’s a story about a little prince who comes from his planet to earth and brings his philosophy with him.  I’m reading it because earlier in the year I was feeling a bit down and my friend Gaby told me that if I read The Little Prince it would make me feel happy.  It worked!  I would recommend it to everybody: it’s a book for kids and adults and everyone in between.  It’s really beautiful.

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Student Reviews!

Posted: August 5, 2011 in Student reviews

This week we were delighted to receive some student book reviews.  Thanks Frida and Anthony!  We love to publish your reviews of books that you have read:  if you would like to submit a review you can do so by leaving one in the comments thread here.

The Count of Monte Cristo.
You’ve probably heard of it.
It’s really good.
But watch out for the (approximately) 6-page description of the innards of the Morcerf house.
Or read the Abridged version (nothing to do with the meaning of “Abridged” on the internet).
That is all.
By Frida C.

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets: A very mysterious book that encounters and reveals the past of Tom Riddle, where it is known as Voldemort now. With such clever connections J.K Rowling has used and created, I recommend this book to all! Have a good time reading :)
By Anthony.

A couple more great reviews have come in from the literary folk in 7S3.  Thanks guys!

Brock
Monster Blood Tattoo- Foundling by D.M Cornish
Foundling is a very intriguing story about a boy that is an orphan. He gets hired to work as a lamplighter, but the way is fraught with danger and he has some help from friends he meets along the way. If you are looking for an adventure story this will be your type of book.

Ellen
A Rose for the Anzac Boys by Jackie French.
Capturing the life of three young women.  War is on and Midge Macpherson is at school learning to be a young lady.  But war is coming closer: Midge’s brothers are in the army, Tim listed as ‘missing’.  To avoid the boredom of school, Midge, Ethel and Anne start a canteen in France, caring for the wounded soldiers.  Midge is thrust into scenes of courage she could never imagine. When the war is over, all three girls discover that going ‘home’ can be strange.

Ewan
Don’t Call Me Ishmael by Michael Gerard Bauer is possibly one of the funniest books I have ever read. It puts a kid who doesn’t fit in together with a whole bunch of social misfits and puts them into a wide range of wacky situations. It shows how a “nerd” can take down a “bully” anytime, even if he has had a brain tumour removed. This is an overall great book and I highly recommend it

Student Reviews: 7S3!

Posted: August 16, 2010 in Student reviews

We have been having a great week for student reviews here at the library blog, with both 7B2 and 7B3 weighing in with their literary opinions.  Not to be outdone, 7S3 dropped in today to let us know what they’ve been reading and loving of late.

Michelle
I Lost My Mobile At The Mall by Wendy Harmer
Excellent book! I loved it! 10 out of 10! Suitable for secondary school students. A humorous book that is easy to read and entertaining. The book talks about a girl who loses her phone and is struggling without it. After her computer is taken away, she realises that there are better things to do.
Many secondary students are exactly like the girl in the book (Eleanor). These days, technology has become a big part of our lives and we rely on it a lot. Without technology, we would be like Eleanor!

Tamika
Forest by Sonya Hartnett
The forest is a dangerous, mysterious, terrifying place, and yet it has a wild beauty to it too. Ruled by fierce, proud, cunning feral felines who stalk the shadows of the territories, it is the natural kingdom of the cat, but for Kian, a lazy, suburban, and worst of all, shiny specimen, the forest is anything but home, and he would do anything to go back. Aided by 5 unlikely companions, a soon-to-be wanderer cat, a brutish, arrogant feline who is eagerly searching for a suitable territory, and a brave, viscous young feral who is following them, as well as 2 small kittens, Kian embarks upon a long journey to find his home. But can he, the kittens and their guides make it through the many perils that the forest offers? And is one of his ‘friends’ really plotting to steal the range, pitiful as it is, that he is planning to return to if he ever does make it?Forest is a beautifully written book that captures the world through the eyes of the feline amazingly. Full of detail, heartbreakingly sad and a truly enchanting read, I rate it 8 and a half out of 10.

Adeline
Notes from the Teenage Underground by Simmone Howell
Personally, Notes from the Teenage Underground is quite different from other books. It is much suited for older readers and tells the story of three school aged rebels who decide to the ‘Underground’ as their theme to work on. Through their adventures, they undergo a series of events, that put many of their relationships on the line. The story tells us about the lives of teenage girls and their hardships and achievements.

Christine
Dragonkeeper by Carole Wilkinson
The start to a great triology. An exciting story about a slave girl who has no memory of who she is or who she’s related to. She doesn’t even know her own name. She beleives that she’s worth nothing but when she uncovers the truth to everything after saving the last imperial dragon from captivity, she finds herself with enough strength and courage to do what must be done. A huge recommendation to all and especially fantasy lovers!!!

Chloe
Mama’s Song by Ben Beaton : 9/10
I enjoyed this book as it only let out part of the background story a bit at a time so you only got the full idea of the story at the end. It also illustrated the relationships between Georgina and others, specifically with her mother. Even though it’s a bit sad it’s still a very heartwarming book. For me it’s the type of book you can’t put down.

Xiaomin
Miss McAllister’s Ghost by Elizabeth Fensham
Miss McAllister is a mysterious old lady who lives down the street from Cassandra and her brothers. One day, after being caught seeking into her house, the children are made to work for Miss McAllister. That is when they find out that she is no ordinary granny. Why does she believe that the queen is dead? What is that ugly face behind a window of an old building down the back of her house? Is Miss McAllister a ghost or just a really, really old lady?
Miss McAllister’s Ghost is an enchanting and breath-taking story about love and friendship by award-winning author Elizabeth Fensham.
Rating:8/10

Michael
Dogs by Bill Condon
The book, Dogs, is about greyhound racing.It is about how two friends train their slow dog into a fast dog while one of the friends’ father despises the dog.
Overall, I think Dogs was an interesting and good book to read.

Tony
Angel Fish by Lili Wilkinson.
You would expect othing less than an excellent book from the daughter of award winning author Caroline Wilkinson, creator of the Dragonkeeper series. Angel Fish is a fine example of the Wilkinson family’s great contribution to literature.
The children of the story, led by their “King” Stephan,embark on a perilous quest through the cities of anciet Europe, in a desperate bid to save the world from the evil sprits know as the Saracen. Along the path a good many predicaments are met, all of which have a significant impact on the story.The heroic children shall discover their true selves and unravel the mystery of the Holy Land.
A fantastic book, of magic, demons and angels. (Note: This book has a religious aspect to it)

David R.
Foundling by D.C. Cornish
Rosamund is a boy with a girl’s name. All his life he has benn a foundling, an orphan. All his life he has wantted two things; to see the sea and to to get a job. So when a man with blooks him to travel inland and become a lamplighter, he is not sure what to do.
A great read. Using clever, yet unusual language, he has created a realistic yet fantastic story.

David N.
Boys of blood and bone by David Metzenthen
I found this book really interesting. One of it’s main focuses is how history can pass through the generations and into general life.It is a good book that has two main storylines that tie into one. One is the story of a dead Australian digger, named Andy Lansell who died in the war while having many family issues. The second part is from Henry Lyon who while on a holiday learns about the story of Andy, partially through some of Andy’s relatives.This book really shows war through a different view.

James
Jarvis 24 by David Mezenthen
This book is about a kid named Marc E. Jarvis. He needs to do work experience, but doesn’t know what to do. He has recently lost one of his best friends, who he loved and will ever forget. But soon he sees a beautiful girl, coming out of a car yard, and decides to do his work experience there, to have more chance of bumping ito the girl.
The book continues about Marc’s life ad how he gets to know the girl. This book has a good storyline and is quite a short read. Suitable for ages 12 – 18

Eric
The Helicopter Man by Elizabeth Fensham
Is about a boy whose dad turns out to be insane. They are poor, so they live in a tin house with onlya a tableand not much food. They are forced to sell many belongings. The story is about how thhe boy finds out his dad is insane and is written in a diary form. The story is very heart warming and makes you think about poor and homeless people and how hard life is for them.
I give this book 3 and a half stars out of five.

QianRui (Madeline)
By the river by Steven Herrick
An amazing Book!
It tells an beautiful story which slowly unveils it self as each page is read.
I would reccomend this book to anyone looking for a relaxing read.

Melinda
Walking Naked by Alyssa Brugman
Pedita Wiguiggan is widely known as the ‘freak’ of the school. She sometimes speaks in Old English. She chants in Latin.
Would it be possible,then, for Megan Tuw-one of the leaders of the ‘in-group’, to become friends with her?

Lang
Siggy and Amber by Doug Macleod
Siggy is a short and skinny boy who lives in a small sesside town of Samsara. He and his best friend, Fergus, have witnessed a mysterious spectacle at Tallis Point (a place full of unexplored ordinances)! Now he has to go back with the new girl at school, Amber, who has an obsession with fish! A funny and engaging book!

Indigo
Two Pearls of Wisdom by Alison Croggon
Eona is in an awkward position, she is pretending to be a boy and in training to be a Dragon-eye. As Eon, she is thrust into a battle for the emperor’s throne. I thought this book was FANTASTIC. She really created a world where you can relate to the characters.
Sometimes the storyline was hard to follow but if you are willing to stick with it, it is worth it.
The book is a typical fantasy novel but is not in any way boring and repetitive. This book is great for over 11s. It is and amazing addition to the world of literature.

Olivia
Liar by Justine Larbaleister
Liar is a total thriller which kept me reading. A combination of murder with a LOT of mystery. Liar makes you question every sentence. A dark, psychological and intense book, Liar holds you in an iron grip until the very last page.

Matthew
Beatle Meets Destiny by Gabrielle Williams
In this book, Beatle meets a new friend, Destiny. He already has a girlfriend, but he cheats. His girlfriend is Cilla. In this book, there are twins. Beatle has a twin. His mum is a twin. There are many things situated in Melbourne, the No 16 tram, Malvern Road, and Chadstone. At the end, on Friday 13 November Beatle meets Destiny. On Friday 13 february and March they met only.
Written on Friday 13 August 2010.

Daniel
Don’t call me Ishmael by Michael Gerard Bauer.
This is a great book. It is very funny and is written in the first person so you get to see everything Ishmael thinks and his opinion for everything.
The story is about a 14 year old boy named Ishmael, who is named after the narrator of Herman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’. Ishmael thinks he has a rare disease called ‘Ishmael Leseur Syndrome’ which supposedly gives anyone with the name Ishmael Leseur bad luck. This is a hilariously fun year at St Daniel’s for Ishmael.

Conor
World Shaker by Richard Harland
Col lives on the upperdecks of the Worldshaker, a mobile city as big as a mountain. He has been chosen as next Supreme Commander when a filthy girl, Filthies being the despised and lowest rankd living things on board, breaks into his room. ‘Don’t let ‘em take me!’ she begs. Will he hand her over or will he break all the rules? Col’s safe, elite world is about to fall apart. A compelling read that makes you reconsider yourplace in the world. It received rave reviews from Ian Irvine and D.M. Cornish, author of ‘Foundling’.

Student Reviews: 7B3!

Posted: August 16, 2010 in Student reviews

On Friday we were lucky enough to receive some wonderful book reviews from the good people of 7B3, a class full of prolific and discerning readers.  Here are their thoughts on what they’ve been reading.

Jack
Seven Ancient Wonders by Matthew Reilly
Makes Indiana Jones look like an outing for the retired archeologists club.
Great book, I recommend it to everyone.

Tiger
The Five Greatest Warriors by Matthew Reilly.
It’s like the Da Vinci Code on a rollercoaster.
The plot is extremely well planned, a surprise around every corner.
Recommended of course.

Sarah & Judy
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
This book is absolutely amazing. It is about a girl called Katniss and a boy called Peeta. They are selected as tributes from district 12 to participate in the nation wide ‘Hunger Games’. There are 2 tributes from each district and they have to fight to the death in the arena. The games are a reminder of the rebellion which tried to override the government and the district that started it, district 13, was destroyed. *scary music*

Ewan
The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
This is a fantastic book, unpredictable and not entirely normal. The plot changes throughout the whole book, and you get an attachment to the characters.

Sachinee
A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray
This book is set in 1895 and is about the life of 16 year old Gemma Doyle after he mother dies.She leaves India for a ‘proper’ boarding school in England and it is here that her powers to attract the supernatural unfolds. Following the past of a group called the Order, she along with her friends becomes entangled in great dangers.
A great read that can not be put down! ENJOY!

Sami
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
Couldn’t put it down.
A mixture of science fiction and fantasy.
Recommended to anyone and everyone.

Student Reviews: 7B2!

Posted: August 13, 2010 in Student reviews

Our ‘Student Reviews’ section (over on the right) is always open to Uni High students with opinions about books. This week we have had some lovely reviews from 7B2. We have posted these people’s literary insights below for you to read. Every student who has a review published on this site wins a small but glorious prize from the library!

Davis Moore:
Eagle Strike– Anthony Horowitz
A intense book full of action and excitment.
Great Book

Hannah Potter:
To Kill a Mockingbird
By Harper Lee
To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the best book I’ve ever read. It rocks!

Emma Basile:
Alice in Wonderland was one of the best books I’ve read. There is lots of action and adventures and Lewis Carroll wrote it amazingly.

Zoe Crawford:
Charlotte’s Web is a lovely story that is sweet and a easy read. You get captured in the story and its wise words and passion. I like this book and I think it should be read and enjoyed by all (or most.)

Katerina Kosmidis:
Catch Me If You Can is a humorous, cunning and absoloutely brilliant book. You’ll be amazed at what this con man can do…

Penelope Amanatidis:
Vampire Academy is a very fun-filled book. It is a fantasy novel. It has fights and it has romance too! It is nothing like Twilight, it’s way better. I think it is one of the best books I’ve ever read, after Harry Potter! which is fantastic! – read Vampire Academy, it’s awesome. I would recommend it to 13+

Amanda Chang:
House Rules is a terrific book filled with heartache, guilt and an Obsessive Compulsive Detective!

Max Ruan:
The Diamonds series are good.
The Phoenix Files are pretty good.
A Series of Unfortunate Events is great.
CHERUB is purely awesome!! CHERUB is a must read
Anthony Horowitz is good.
Max is awesome!

An Jiang:
Looking for Alaska is the best book I have read this year, it is by John Green and I really liked it because it has just the right touch of everything: Love, lust, loss, everything. It is a great book and I recommend it strongly ♥

James Tassoulas:
Well I think the the Cherub series is the best!!!!! and my favourite book is Class A which is the second book in the series and I personally think that the Cherub series is a must read!!!!!!!

Daniel O’Connor:
Henderson brothers. The escape.
It’s a great book that has danger around every corner. ~Good book

Philip Chen:
Tales of Despereaux
I believe Tales of Despereaux is a great book, because it can fit nearly every single type of reader. It is a jolly book including comedy, adventure, romance and it even conyains a little bit of HOPE!

Amy Fehmel:
The City Of Bones: It’s one of the best books I’ve ever read. It’s got adventure as well as romance and it’s just a great book.

Harry Sanders:
The cherub series are awesome.

Tony Luo:
The Alex Rider series are stunning!

Helen Seoung:
The Declaration and The resistance is aweeeesome. I would recommend it to ppl 12+